Hebrews: Jesus and Humanity

Hebrews 2:1-9Psalm 8:1-91 Corinthians 15:50-57


Like anyone who loves happiness, I dread the thought of sitting in the nosebleed section of a stadium during a game. After all, who in his right mind would want to sit as far away from the field as possible? I do, however, have an appreciation for the aerial shots of a televised football game. Such shots tend to put the biggest and strongest athletes in perspective—they’re still relatively small. 

In Psalm 8, David—who seems to have had a keen eye for the book of nature, which was perhaps strengthened from his days as a shepherd—contrasted mankind with the majesty of the heavenly bodies: “When I observe your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars, which you set in place, what is a human being that you remember him, a son of man that you look after him?” (vv.3–4).There is perhaps nothing so effective at reminding us of our insignificance as looking up at the starry skies. Both their vast distance away and their glory leave us awestruck. We are so small and insignificant by comparison.

Though we are so much smaller, so much less glorious than the night sky, the psalmist, speaking of God’s assessment of man, goes on to say, “You made him little less than God and crowned him with glory and honor. You made him ruler over the works of your hands; you put everything under his feet” (vv.5–6). It is absolutely astonishing—even after the fall—the sorts of things God allows man to accomplish. We have built cities, developed amazing technologies, and even discovered cures for some diseases. These are, in small part, a picture of what it means for man to have dominion over creation.

Nevertheless, men still die in fires, while at sea, and occasionally even by wild animal attack. Since the  fall of Adam, man has not been able to fully exercise dominion over this world for the glory of God. The writer of Hebrews, picking up on the teaching of Psalm 8, puts it this way: “As it is, we do not yet see everything subjected to him” (Hebrews 2:8). He then adds, “But we do see Jesus—made lower than the angels for a short time so that by God’s grace he might taste death for everyone—crowned with glory and honor because he suffered death” (v.9). Though the kingdom of God has come, it is not yet fully here. Sin remains in the world, and our dominion is limited until Christ returns. 

In the meantime, we wait with hope, looking to Jesus, the One who has already conquered sin and death. We know that when He returns, we will reign with Him for all eternity. That is our sure future. Our ultimate significance is found not in what we can accomplish in this life, but in our union with Christ now and forevermore.   


Written by Nick Batzig

Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Jesus

Jesus

Yeshua (Hebrew), Iesous (Greek)

Scripture Reading: John 14:12-14Acts 4:5-12Romans 10:8-13Philippians 2:5-11Revelation 1:4-8


Description

The Hebrew name Yeshua, or “Jesus,” means “Yahweh saves.” It is a shortened version of the Hebrew name Yehoshu’a, or “Joshua.” Jesus, a common name in the first century AD, was the human name the Lord was given on earth. Mary and Joseph obediently gave the child this name because an angel of the Lord visited Joseph in a dream and told him, “you are to name him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins” (Mt 1:21). 

Scripture often combines the name Jesus with the Greek word for messiah, Christos, or “Christ.” The name “Jesus Christ” joins the two names in order to recognize Jesus as the anointed Savior. The New Testament keeps Jesus’s human name and His designation as the Christ linked after the resurrection, emphasizing that He remains fully man and fully God with all authority in heaven and on earth. 


Emphasis

The name of the incarnate Son of God


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Hebrews: The Nature of the Son

Hebrews 1:1-142 Samuel 7:12-15John 1:1-52 Corinthians 4:4-6


Hebrews 10:31 says, “It is a terrifying thing to fall into the hands of the living God.” I love that verse for the same reasons I love the entire book of Hebrews. First, I love the poetry of the line. It’s a beautifully crafted statement and image—lyrical, ironic, forthright, and severe. The entire book is this way—filled with imagery, concepts, warnings, and encouragement that read like poetic meditations on glorious and fearful things.

Also, I love how the line frames the holiness of God and our need for redemption, another theme that runs throughout the book. This is a beautiful, powerful, sometimes terrifying book if you read it without humility, reverence, and a sense of awe before the Lord.

But if you read it with humble eyes and an open heart, you’ll find Hebrews fights for our hearts. It lifts our eyes up from our present struggles—and in the case of the original audience, from persecution—to consider the eternal glory and majesty of Christ and to find our hope there.

This letter was written to Christians with Jewish roots. They were being persecuted for their faith, and many were wondering if it was worth it to continue to claim the name of Christ. To these people facing these struggles, the author clearly says, “Long ago God spoke to the fathers by the prophets at different times and in different ways. In these last days, he has spoken to us by his Son. God has appointed him heir of all things and made the universe through him” (Hebrews 1:1–2).

You’ll notice as you read that the author threads this letter with dozens of references to the Old Testament. He does this to demonstrate that everything the Hebrew people’s forefathers believed in and hoped for has been fulfilled in Christ. And Christ will finish the saving work He began. Where else can they go? To what else can they cling?

The power and supremacy of Christ described in this letter would cause any of us to tremble in His presence. It is a terrifying thing to fall into the hands of the living God. But to adapt a phrase from the disciple Peter, where else should we fall? He alone has the words of life. May the daily Scripture readings in this study plan challenge you, inspire you, correct you where needed, and deepen your confidence in God’s ability and resolve to rid the world of all evil and make all things new. 


Written by Russ Ramsey

Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Messiah

Messiah

Mashiach (Hebrew), Christos (Greek)

Scripture Reading: Psalm 2:1-3Isaiah 61:1-11Matthew 16:13-20Luke 24:18-27John 10:24-25John 11:25-27


Description

The Hebrew word mashiach, or “messiah,” was used to refer to the promised savior of God’s people. The word mashiach was translated into the Greek as christos, which is translated into English as “Christ.” “Messiah” and “Christ” are two titles that describe Jesus as the anointed, or chosen, one of Israel. 

The word mashiach was used to describe someone who was anointed for a particular calling. In Scripture, people called to serve as prophets, priests, and kings were anointed with oil to ceremonially set them apart for their particular work. Jesus perfectly fulfilled all three of these roles for His people through His life, death, and resurrection. He is the chosen and anointed one who perfectly fulfilled His calling as the savior of God’s people.


Emphasis

God’s chosen and anointed one


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Father

Father

Ab (Hebrew), Pater (Greek) 

Scripture Reading: Deuteronomy 32:1-6Psalm 68:4-6Jeremiah 3:19–22Mark 14:35-36Romans 8:14-17Galatians 4:1-7


Description

When Jesus taught His disciples to pray, He told them to address God as “our Father” (Mt 6:9). When He prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane before His arrest, trial, and crucifixion, Jesus cried out, “Abba, Father,” using personal and relational names for God (Mk 14:36). Abba is an Aramaic word, from the Hebrew Ab, for “father.” Pater is the Greek word used for “father.” 

These are deeply familial names when used to address God. Belief brings us into a close yet respectful relationship with God, the holy Creator of all things. Father is a reverential yet personal name for God. 


Emphasis

The personal, familial, and intimate name for God


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Shepherd


Ro’i 
(Hebrew), Ro’eh (Hebrew), Poimen (Greek)

Scripture Reading: Psalm 23:1-6Ezekiel 34:11-16John 10:11-18Hebrews 13:20-211 Peter 2:22-25


Description

In Psalm 23, David writes of the Lord as a shepherd: He leads His sheep to calm pasture to eat, He leads them to water to drink, He keeps them on the right path, and He uses His rod to and staff to protect them. In John 10, Jesus calls Himself “the Good Shepherd.” He outlines His similar responsibilities: He lays down His life to protect His sheep, He gathers His sheep, and He speaks over His sheep. When He takes the name “Shepherd,” it doesn’t just reveal His role as our protective, sacrificial caretaker, it also reveals our role to remain loyal and dependent upon Him.


Emphasis

God as our provider and caretaker


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

The Names of God: Jealous

Jealous God

El Qanna (Hebrew)

Scripture Reading: Exodus 20:4-6Exodus 34:10-16Deuteronomy 4:23-24Joshua 24:14-20Nahum 1:1-61 Corinthians 10:14-22


Description

God called Himself a “jealous God” in Exodus 20 when He spoke to Moses at Mount Sinai. This name reminds us that God does not take lightly nor tolerate our wandering hearts. He alone is worthy of our worship and praise, and He will not share it with another.

Scripture presents God as jealous for His deity, His sovereignty, and His glory. Throughout the Old Testament, God uses this name to emphasize that He alone is God, and He alone is holy and worthy of our worship. 


Emphasis

God’s right to be the only object of worship


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Refuge and Fortress

Refuge & Fortress

Machseh, Metsudah (Hebrew)

Scripture Reading: Deuteronomy 33:26-292 Samuel 22:1-3Psalm 18:1-3Psalm 71:1-8Isaiah 25:1-5


Description

When God’s people claim He is their refuge or fortress, they are saying He is a safe place in times of trouble. He will take care of them and protect them. King David uses “refuge” frequently to refer to God—a telling admission from the powerful, mighty king of all Israel who led victorious armies into battle. This name of God uses the image of finding safety and rest in a city or fortress to communicate the security God’s people have in Him. 


Emphasis

God’s protection from external threats


Reflection

What do these names teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: El Shadday (God Almighty)

God Almighty

El Shadday (Hebrew)

Scripture Reading: Genesis 17:1-8Exodus 6:2-52 Corinthians 6:14-18Revelation 11:16-19


Description

El Shadday, or “God Almighty,” is a name God uses to describe Himself throughout the Old Testament. He appears to Abraham in Genesis 17 with the greeting, “I am God Almighty.” Then God makes a covenant with Abraham, promising to make him the father of a great nation, even though Abraham was old and his wife was barren. God offered His name, God Almighty, as the guarantee of this improbable promise. Bound up in God’s covenant promise to Abraham is the Lord’s proclamation of His power. 

The name God Almighty also appears frequently in the book of Job to emphasize God’s power over all things. El Shadday is a powerful, impressive name for our God.  


Emphasis

God’s power over all things


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Living God and God Most High

Living God & God Most High
Elohim Chay, El Elyon (Hebrew) 

Scripture Reading: Genesis 14:17-202 Kings 19:14-18Psalm 91:1-16Jeremiah 10:10-11Hosea 1:101 Timothy 4:10


Description
Elohim Chay, “Living God,” and El Elyon, “God Most High,” are two of the most frequently used names for God in the Old Testament. The name Elohim was paired with adjectives that describe the God of Israel. These two names, though different, are related. They are used to emphasize the unique nature of God: He is alive and greater than all others.  

The very notion of a living God distinguished Elohim from idols constructed of wood or iron. The Israelite God was—and is—living and active in and among His people. Similarly, the name “God Most High” elevates the God of Israel over all other gods. These names are reminders that God is active and superior to all other objects of worship. 


Emphasis
God’s superiority over all other gods and idols


Reflection
What do these names teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Spirit

Spirit
Ruach (Hebrew), Pneuma (Greek)

Scripture Reading: Numbers 11:24-30Psalm 51:10-13John 4:19-24John 14:15-26Acts 2:1-4Acts 10:44-48


Description
The Old Testament contains many references to ruach, the Spirit of the Lord, which was the manifestation of God’s presence on earth. The New Testament uses pneumafor the Holy Spirit, the third person of the Trinity. 

In John 4, Jesus tells the woman at the well that God is spirit. He was referring to the time, which has now come, when the Spirit of the Lord would no longer reside in temples built by human hands. Instead, the Holy Spirit dwells inside those who believe in Jesus.


Emphasis
The non-incarnate, or non-physical, presence of God on earth


Reflection
What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Lord of Armies

Lord of Armies

Yahweh Tsebaoth, Yahweh Elohim Tsebaoth, Elohim Tsebaoth (Hebrew)

Scripture Reading: 1 Samuel 1:1-112 Samuel 7:22-29Psalm 80:4-7Amos 5:14-15Haggai 2:6-9Malachi 1:11-14Luke 2:13-14


Description

The Hebrew root word tsaba, or “a gathering of people,” is frequently used in the Bible to describe armies preparing for war. When paired with the name of God in Yahweh Tsebaoth, it reveres Him as being over hosts of angelic armies who gather in His name and serve at His command. All creation is subject to the LORD of Armies. “LORD of Hosts,” “God of Armies,” and “LORD God of Armies” are versions of this name.

“LORD of Armies” most frequently appears in the Minor Prophets, especially in Malachi, where almost half of the verses in the book contain this name in some form. During the time of the prophets, the people of God were living in exile in Babylon. They faced daily reminders of the presence and power of the enemy armies keeping them in captivity. They called out to God as the LORD of Armies, whose vast angelic armies could deliver them from trouble. LORD of Armies is a name that assures us of the power of our mighty God. 


Emphasis

The security, power, and strength of God in the face of His enemies


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Holy One

Holy One
Qadosh (Hebrew)

Scripture Reading: Psalm 78:40-43Psalm 89:15-18Isaiah 41:12-20Revelation 4:1-8


Description
The Hebrew word qadosh is translated “set apart as holy.” It can be used in a general sense to describe places, objects, and people who have been set apart for religious purposes. But as a name, Qadosh, or “Holy One,” describes God as one who is set apart from His creation, from all pagan gods, and from everything else because of His perfection. This name works like a double-edged sword: it reminds us that God is perfectly holy in every way, and it reminds us that we are not. The distinction of being the Holy One belongs to Him alone. This name exalts God above all others in His holiness. 


Emphasis
The righteousness and holiness of God


Reflection
What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

Names of God: Immanuel (God With Us)

God With Us

Immanuel (Hebrew), Immanuel (Greek)

Scripture Reading: Isaiah 7:13-17Matthew 1:18-25Matthew 28:19-20John 1:10-18Revelation 21:3


Description

The name Immanuel, or “God is with us,” appears in the book of Isaiah in key prophecies predicting the coming of the Messiah. The name carries a sense of nearness, including intimate knowledge of the needs, struggles, and hopes of humanity. When Isaiah prophesies about the virgin birth, he says that her child will be called Immanuel. This is not a proper name as much as it is a description of what the Messiah would be like. 

In Matthew, an angel tells Joseph to name the child Jesus, because “He will save His people from their sins” (Mt 1:23). This name describes what Immanuel would do. Together, the names Immanuel and Jesus mean “God will be with His people and He will save them from their sins.” God saves His people and is close to them.


Emphasis

God’s nearness to and presence with His people


Reflection

What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

The Names of God: Adonay (Lord)

Lord
Adonay (Hebrew), Kurios (Greek)

Scripture Reading: Genesis 15:1-6Exodus 4:10-16Deuteronomy 10:17-21Matthew 14:22-32John 20:24-291 Corinthians 8:5-6Revelation 17:14


Description
In the Old Testament, adonay, or “lord,” was a common way to refer to God. It comes from the word used to describe human masters who ruled over servants. The Israelites used it verbally instead of pronouncing the name Yahweh, and it communicated their reverence for the Holy God of Israel as their ruler and ultimate authority. Adonay is a reminder that we serve a holy, sovereign God who is Lord over all. 

Kurios, or “lord” in the New Testament, was used to show respect to people with authority like emperors or masters. It is used to describe both God the Father and Jesus the Son in the New Testament. When followers of Jesus called Him “lord,” they showed Him honor. In Paul’s letters, he used the word as a title for the risen Jesus. “Lord Jesus Christ” became a primary way to refer to Him, implying He shared the authority of the God of Israel. Kurios is a powerful name of honor for Jesus. 


Emphasis
A title of honor, respecting the authority and ruling power of God


Reflection
What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

The Names of God: Elohim

God
Elohim, El  (Hebrew)

Scripture Reading: Genesis 1:1-5Job 37:5-13Psalm 42:1-11Isaiah 43:10-13


Description
Elohim is the first name used for God in the Bible. It appears in the opening verse of Scripture: “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” (Gn 1:1). The Israelites adapted the name Elohim from El, an ancient word for “god,” to refer to the one true God. This name emphasizes His greatness and majesty over all creation and all other gods. Throughout Scripture this name is paired with descriptive words to distinguish God and His character from pagan gods (e.g., El Olam, “everlasting God,” El Roi, “God who sees,” and El Rahum, “merciful God”). Elohim is a reminder that the one true God is distinctly powerful.


Emphasis
God’s unmatched power and majesty


Reflection
What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

The Names of God: Yahweh

In this Names of God reading plan, we are learning more about God by studying the names given to Him in Scripture. Rather than having our writers share their own reflections on these passages, we’ve instead provided research-rich content to aid in your study of each day’s featured name of God, including the background of the name(s), a brief explanation of the character of God emphasized by the name(s), and a reflection question to help you dig deeper into the text.

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Yahweh
YHWH (Hebrew)

Scripture Reading: Exodus 3:7-16Exodus 34:1-9Psalm 15:1-5Isaiah 42:5-9John 8:58


Description
Yahweh is a profoundly holy name, but it is also unmistakably personal. Yahweh is distinct from other names of God because it is self-revealed. It is the intimate, covenantal, relational name of God. Modern English translations of the Bible often use small capital letters for YHWH.

When Moses asks God for His name in Exodus 3, God reveals Himself as “I Am Who I Am,” and then calls Himself Yahweh. In Exodus 34, He again proclaims His name as He describes His character to Moses. His name is a core part of the covenantal promise He makes with Moses—Yahweh will always be who He is.


Emphasis
The name God gives Himself, highlighting His covenantal and relational nature


Reflection
What does this name teach me about God?


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

This is The Gospel: All Creation Will Be Restored

Psalm 24:1-2Isaiah 65:17-25Revelation 21:1-5Revelation 21:22-272 Peter 3:10-13


I have a scar down the middle of my chest. I see it every day. It peeks up above my shirt collar just a little bit and my eye finds it most times when I look in the mirror. I have an affection for that scar. It reminds me of a time not long ago when my life was threatened by an infection in my heart, which required a team of surgeons to open me up and fix me.

The scar reminds me of how fragile life can be. It also reminds me of how resilient our bodies are. We were made to live. Death is a result of the fall, a consequence of sin. In my case, the doctors did their part, and then my body took over, working to put itself back together in a way that bore witness to the idea that we were created for life.

We come to the end of this Scripture reading plan focusing on a truth that is pretty difficult to get our minds and hearts around, but is nevertheless true and lies at the heart of—and is the entire point of—redemption. That truth is this: one day, every broken thing will be put right. There will be no more death. No more crying. No more sadness. No more suffering. No more injustice. No more betrayal. No more divorce. No more abuse. No more bacterial infections. No more need of doctors to cure them. 

I wonder if, in the new heavens and new earth, my body will bear the scar that runs down my chest. I don’t think it will be there on my glorified body, but what do I know? Here’s what I am confident about, though. The restoration of creation will be accomplished and secured by One who does bear scars—the risen Christ. He bore on His resurrected body the marks of Golgotha’s nails and the centurion’s spear. After the resurrection, He still bore the wounds into which Thomas placed his hand. He still bears the wounds by which we, and all creation, shall be healed. 

One day all creation will be restored. The old order of things—this world of pain, suffering, and affliction—will pass away. But the idea is bigger than just the removal of struggle. When Christ restores His kingdom forever, it isn’t just that the sad things will go away. It’s that everything will be right. Creation itself will be restored completely and forever. The Lord will say, “Look, I am making everything new” (Revelation 21:5). This is where everything is headed, as sure as Christ has risen from the dead.


Written by Russ Ramsey


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

This is the Gospel: Jesus Secures Our Peace with God

John 14:27Colossians 1:13-23Colossians 3:1-42 Corinthians 5:17-191 Corinthians 15:51-57


“Hey, can I talk to you?”

A few years ago, I got that text from my pastor and I gotta tell you, my heart was in my throat. I hate nothing more than someone saying they want to get together and talk, especially if it’s not something we do a lot. If we typically don’t go to lunch or get coffee and you ask me to go to lunch or get coffee with you, I can promise you I will spend most of my waking minutes leading up to said “talk” wondering what I have done to hurt your feelings or offend you. This time was no exception.

For days I wondered what I had done to deserve this. My heart and mind were in violent turmoil. I lost sleep. I constantly turned over various reasons for this meeting in my head. 

Did I criticize something he said and tell the wrong person?
Did I write a blog that the elders are concerned about?
Did I say something in a sermon that was wrong or offended someone?

And then in a moment of clarity I’d tell myself I was being ridiculous. It was probably just coffee to catch up. But then— 

Why not lunch? Why only coffee?
Maybe he doesn’t want it to be long.
Maybe he just wants to deliver a short, to-the-point rebuke with only a small investment of time and money.

I couldn’t get any peace of mind until we met and I knew why he’d called this meeting.

Finally the day came, the appointed hour arrived, aaaaaand… it was just coffee to catch up. That’s it. There was absolute peace between us, but I had been living for a number of days—what seemed like years—as if we were at odds. I had even tried to prepare ammunition for defense of the various fictional criticisms I assumed he would lodge in my direction. Sounds funny in the telling, I know, but I do this all the time, even with God. 

Here’s how it goes: Something bad will happen and I will immediately begin to question how God feels about me. I will doubt His love for me. I’ll assume He’s ticked off about some sin in my life—maybe one I’m completely unaware of—and then I’ll start to think, What is it between us?

But then I remember Paul’s words: “For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile everything to himself… by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross” (Colossians 1:19–20).

I say “remember” because I tend to forget what’s true. I forget that regardless of what suffering I may be going through, even if it’s of my own making, God and I are at peace. I forget that while I still struggle with sin—even sin I’m unaware of—we are at peace.

I am at peace with God, reconciled to Him, but not simply because He’s “nice.” God and I are at peace because peace has been bought for me through the blood His Son Jesus shed on the cross. That peace is unshakable and it cannot be altered. It is not dependent upon feelings, nor does it change with my actions—all the things I do or fail to do. It is as sure as Christ Himself. This peace is a fact, and it is a gift.


Written by Matthew B. Redmond


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website

This is the Gospel: We are saved by Grace through Faith

Ephesians 2:1-10Romans 3:21-26Galatians 4:4-71 Peter 1:3-918-19John 10:27-30


I made a deal with my kids: “Put your dishes away after every meal for a week and I’ll give you a surprise.” Guess how long they made it? Not past breakfast on day one. I restarted the clock. We gave it another go. But on the last day, they were eager to play a game together as a family and left their cups on the table. So I took their cups to the sink for them and still gave them a surprise. Why? Because grace abounds.

In that moment with my kids, I saw a parable of the gospel. There is no amount of achieving or morality, church attending or evangelical rain-dancing in the spiritual disciplines that can get us into God’s grace. The only way we get into God’s grace isthrough God’s provision of grace. Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life—and He Himself is the grace of God for us (John 14:6Titus 2:11).

Real Christianity is the message that salvation is always and only for undeserving sinners. Salvation is non-achievable—a complete gift of grace and mercy to sinners from the nail-pierced hands of Jesus Christ. 

Did you ask Him to go toe-to-toe with Satan in the wilderness for you?
Did you ask Him to die for you back in 33 AD?
Did you ask Him to rise from the dead, defeating sin and death for you? 

The answer to all of the above is no. Jesus did all of this without you asking Him. Grace was coming for you before you were born, before you asked, and before you knew Him. Grace came for you.

There are a lot of competing voices in the world, but the real gospel rings out a simple message: You can be saved if you will give up trying to save yourself and abandon all other methods of salvation, believing in Christ alone. 

Trust His death for the death of your sins (Galatians 2:20). Trust that His stack of folded-up grave clothes means you’ve been clothed in garments of salvation and a robe of righteousness (Isaiah 61:10). Trust that the last set of sandal prints He left before He ascended back to the Father means that we will one day see Him face to face (1 Corinthians 13:12). His work on your behalf is your only hope. It is done. He has done it all. You are saved by grace, and by grace alone. 


Written by J.A. Medders


Blessings.

*This devotional was taken from the He Reads Truth website